10 Best Things To Do In Iceland

The Northern Lights are one of the most spectacular shows and can frequently be seen in Akureyri and surroundings from September to mid-April on clear nights.


Why chase the crowds when the wonders of Iceland can be marvelled in a quieter setting? Step away from the hustle and bustle and enjoy the top sights and attractions in the south-western part of Iceland, without all the traffic, in a smaller bus and with a smaller group (max 16). This peaceful excursion takes place in the afternoon and lasts into the evening and allows plenty of time to explore all the wonders encountered.


Make this a romantic tour for two, or bring family and friends. Either way, you are sure to have an experience that will be forever cherished. This is truly the best time of day to enjoy the magic of Iceland!

SANDGERÐI

SANDGERÐI

Sandgerði is a vital fishing community on the western side of Reykjanes peninsula and has a community of 1600 inhabitants. It offers guests a lot of things to do such as bird-watching, golfing and stopping by the local swimming pool. By Hafurbjarnastaðir, you can visit graves from pre-Christians times, - discovered in 1947 and are considered very important in history, as well as the Suðurnes Science and Learning Center that has two interesting exhibitions to explore. A newly constructed road offers travelers to make a round trip around the coast passing Hvalnes church that was built in 1887 and where one of Iceland’s most cherished poets, Hallgrímur Pétursson, was a priest.

VOGAR

VOGAR

The town of Vogar is located in an old fishing village in the midst of stunning beauty that’s ideal for walking. The area surrounding Vogar offers beginner to expert hiking trails and Háibjalli and the nearby Snorrastaðatjarnir pond are also a popular national parks and one of the more popular activities even with the locals. If you’re visiting in August, Family Day is a fun thing to do and is celebrated with people of all ages, both locals and visitors, gather together for activities like soap-soccer, fishing in the harbor, a home-made car race, and many other organized events for the whole family to participate. Vogar also has an excellent golf course that is one of the most popular attractions of the area, as well as one of the largest wooden churches in Iceland, Kálfaneskirkja, built in 1893.

GRINDAVÍK

GRINDAVÍK

Grindavík is a scenic fishing town on the south coast of the Reykjanes peninsula. The landscape surrounding Grindavík is imposing and awe-inspiring with enormous hardened lava cliffs are near the top the list for Iceland’s natural attractions. The town has all the necessary amenities and recreational activities, a beautiful golf course, and a newly rebuilt geothermal swimming pool. Furthermore, it has a bank, grocery stores, a variety of shops, and a camping site that’s considered one of the best in the country. You can also travel historic trails such as Prestastígur, Skógfellsvegur, and Reykjavegur, or visit the Hópsnes circle with its famous shipwrecks. The Reykjanes lighthouse is also a very interesting sight to see as well as the Saltfish Museum, or the Þorbjarnarfell mountain - ideal for hiking where you can enjoy a spectacular view of Grindavík and the surrounding area.

The Blue Lagoon and spa is not only the most popular attraction in Grindavík but the most sought after attraction in all of Iceland, so it can get a bit crowded. Annual visits in the lagoon surpass the population of Iceland year after year and in the high-season, the Blue Lagoon can see over three thousand visitors per day. Guests enjoy bathing and relaxing in the spa-like geothermal seawater as it is considered to have excellent effects on the skin.

GARÐUR

GARÐUR

Gardur is a beautiful fishing village on the north side of Reykjanes peninsula, known for its lighthouses and a magical view over Faxaflói Bay. It was once the most populated village as a result of the fishing grounds but today the village is home to 1425 people.


Outdoor enthusiasts should not miss out on visiting Gardur. On Gardskagi Bay, you can see diverse bird life, dolphins, and even go whale watching without ever leaving the shore surrounded by untouched nature. A very interesting regional museum tells the story of the fishermen and the history of the people that lived and worked in the community. Garður has an excellent camping site with all necessary facilities, such as bathrooms, running water, and electricity.

Don’t miss the red striped Garðskagi Lighthouse that was built in 1897 and used until recently as a center for studying the thousands of migrating birds which arrive on the peninsula from Greenland and North America each year to breed.

HAFNARFJÖRÐUR

HAFNARFJÖRÐUR

Hafnarfjordur is beautiful seaside town, located a short driving distance from Reykjavik. The community is home to a varied birdlife, a range of natural wonders and the largest population of ‘Hidden Folks’ in Iceland. The hidden folks, or huldufólk as locals call then, are the mysterious but friendly elves that live in the crags and lava rocks that are scattered throughout Hafnarfjordur. But are they real, you ask? You’ll have to ask the locals.


Hafnarfjordur has a range of shops, cafés and restaurants with local Icelandic food that you can enjoy during your visit. Naturally it also offers plenty of outdoor activities while there are also museums and galleries that turn the spotlight on the town’s history, music, and visual arts.

Numerous well-known nature spots to see are within a short driving distance from Hafnarfjörður with unspoiled geothermal fields and striking seaside views. These areas are ideal for hikes, or even horseback riding tours. The town has an impressive annual Viking Festival that should not be missed and attracts visitors from all around the country, and during Christmas the center is transformed into the charming Yuletide village, with a Christmas market where you can buy local handicraft and home-made goods.

REYKJANESBÆR

REYKJANESBÆR

The ‘town’ of Reykjanes is actually a larger area and peninsula that includes the villages of Keflavík, Njarðvík, Hafnir and Ásbrú. The area is known for being young, vibrant and rapidly growing and each of the villages has its own unique characteristics. The towns profit from being close to the capital, but also from being the home to the only international airport in the country. and has a lot of cool things to do and, of course, beautiful surrounding landscapes. Here are a few highlights you can find on the peninsula:


Duus Museum Houses: The cluster of buildings that make up The Duus Museum Houses is among Iceland’s most remarkable and historic. The oldest building was constructed in 1877 and the newest in 1954 and represent almost a century of Icelandic architectural history. Today, it houses a range of exhibition centers; Reykjanes Art Museum, the Reykjanes Maritime Center, the Reykjanes Heritage museum, the Reykjanes Geopark Visitor Centre and a tourist information Centre.


Art Museum: The Reykjanes Art Museum was reopened in 2003 after extensive renovations and now offers a spectacular view over the Keflavík’s marina along with some high-quality art, with new exhibitions opening every six weeks. Reykjanes Art Museum has been renowned for being amongst the best art museum in Iceland in regards to quality and variety.


Maritime Centre: The Reykjanes Maritime Centre was opened in 2002 and is home to a great collection of 100 model boats, all built by a retired local skipper, Grímur Karlsson. Hand-crafted to a high degree of perfection and painstaking detail, they offer guests a unique insight into Iceland’s significant maritime history.


Heritage Museum: The Reykjanes Heritage Museum presents temporary exhibitions that address varied aspects in the local history of the Reykjanes region. A new exhibition opened in 2014 and covers the main aspects of the history from the settlement period in the early 9thcentury to the middle of the 20th century. It particularly focuses on the development of seaside villages in the 19th, and early 20thcentury where the nearby fishing was essential in daily life. a big role.

Geopark Visitor Centre: The Geopark Visitor Center serves as a regional tourist information center and houses a very interesting exhibition on the geology of the Reykjanes peninsula. Visitors are offered the opportunity to learn about the geology and nature of the peninsula in a simple, interactive and accessible way. The exhibition outlines the formation of the area in geological terms along with the uniqueness, nature, history, service, and recreation of Reykjanes.


The Icelandic Museum of Rock and Roll: This new museum is an interesting thing to do during your travels and dives into the history of the amazing Icelandic music scene. You can walk through the history of Icelandic pop and rock music and dig deep into the history of each artist with the Rock ‘n’ Roll app, played on ipads throughout the exhibitions. The museum also has a Sound Lab where you can try out some instruments and feel like a real rocker, a Music Hall of Fame, a café, and a souvenir shop where you can stock up on local music.


Viking World: Vikingaheimar or The Viking World is maybe best known for being the home of the Viking ship, The Icelander. The ship is an exact replica of the famous Gokstad ship, an extraordinary archaeological find of an almost completely intact Viking ship that was excavated in Norway in 1882. There is also the exhibition ‘The North Atlantic Viking Saga,’ Fate of the Gods, and the Iceland Saga Trails. The spectacular Viking World building can easily be spotted from the highway from Keflavik International Airport, and is located just a few minutes’ drive from the airport.

Hornbjarg

REYKJANES