10 Best Things To Do In Iceland

The Northern Lights are one of the most spectacular shows and can frequently be seen in Akureyri and surroundings from September to mid-April on clear nights.


Why chase the crowds when the wonders of Iceland can be marvelled in a quieter setting? Step away from the hustle and bustle and enjoy the top sights and attractions in the south-western part of Iceland, without all the traffic, in a smaller bus and with a smaller group (max 16). This peaceful excursion takes place in the afternoon and lasts into the evening and allows plenty of time to explore all the wonders encountered.


Make this a romantic tour for two, or bring family and friends. Either way, you are sure to have an experience that will be forever cherished. This is truly the best time of day to enjoy the magic of Iceland!

DJÚPIVOGUR

DJÚPIVOGUR

Djúpivogur is a pleasant area extending across three fjords: Berufjörður, Hamarsfjördur and Álftafjörður. The pyramid-shaped Mt. Búlandstindur dominates the landscape and according to legend, it can make wishes come true during the summer solstice. The historic buildings and small harbour are well worth exploring. The town is best known for the 34 granite egg sculptures by the water called "Eggin í Gleðivík" ("The Eggs of Merry Bay"). For nature lovers, visit the Búlandsnes bird sanctuary or catch a boat to Papey Island, and if you decide to go hiking in the fascinating mountains and valleys, you might even spot a reindeer!

BREIÐDALUR

BREIÐDALUR

The town of Breiðdalur is set in Breiðdalsvík - the longest and widest of the valleys in Eastern Iceland and a must see place in Iceland’s East. It’s surrounded by majestic mountains and has a terrific view along the length of the valley, including remnants of an old volcano. Visit the geological centre to learn the volcanic history of Breiðdalur along with the origins of the colourful minerals. The centre also houses a collection on linguist Stefán Einarsson and his research on the Icelandic language. The area surrounding the village offers great opportunities for many outdoor activities like horseback riding, fishing, bird-watching, and hiking.

STÖÐVARFJÖRÐUR

STÖÐVARFJÖRÐUR

The fishing village is famous for its scenery and the picturesque mountain panorama which makes hiking and outdoor sightseeing very popular in the area. Visit Saxa, a unique sea geyser or try some of the hiking routes around Jafnadalur valley. One of Iceland’s most beautiful natural rock arches are located in the valley. Art and handicrafts flourish in the village with talented and innovated locals displaying ceramics, graphics and woollens. For a unique and fun thing to do, visit Petra’s Mineral Collection - a once private collection of multicolored stones and minerals now on beautiful display in the collectors home and throughout her gardens.

FÁSKRÚÐSFJÖRÐUR

FÁSKRÚÐSFJÖRÐUR

Fáskrúðsfjörður can be found in a grassy valley with arctic woodlands at the bottom of the fjord and is another popular area for hiking and culture. The route from Reyðarfjörður along the coast is very scenic and offers excellent views of the hollow cliff island Skrúður, home to the unique ‘Puffin Cave’ sheltering thousands of puffins and a colony of Gannets that you can watch plunge into the water below. In the late 19th century until 1935, the town was the main hub for French fishermen and is still known for its French heritage and even still has a French Quarter and a French Museum. In July the village celebrates ‘French Days’ and their connections with the sister town of Gravelines, France.

REYÐARFJÖRÐUR

REYÐARFJÖRÐUR

Like most other towns in the East Fjords, it is surrounded by mountains and though the climate is particularly rainy and foggy, on clear summer days it often has the highest temperatures in Iceland. Due to its strategic location and excellent harbour conditions, it became the second-largest of the Allied bases in Iceland during Word War II. The remains of the occupation are fairly visible, ranging from an airport and old barracks to small gun shelters. A World War II museum is located at the old camp above the town and is a very interesting thing to do in Iceland - visit a war museum in a country that has never been at war. There are many options for hiking, and a walk to the waterfall in Búðará is recommended. A hike to the friendly, sheltered area beneath the shrub-covered slopes of Mt. Grænafell is an absolute must.

ESKIFJÖRÐUR

ESKIFJÖRÐUR

Eskifjörður is a charming seaside village with a magnificent view of the mighty mountain Hólmatindur. Determined hikers can walk to the top of Hólmatindur and write their name in the guestbook. Visit the famous Iceland crystal mine - which operated between the 17th to 20th century where some of the largest spar crystals have been excavated from the mines. Randulff’s fisherman-lodge is a beautifully preserved shore-building where you can try traditional Iclandic food like shark meat and dried fish - both produced in Eskifjordur. You can also rent a boat for fishing cod and haddock. Eskifjordur has all necessary amenities such as grocery and specialty stores, a pharmacy, guesthouses, camping area and a beautiful geothermal heated outdoor swimming pool.

SEYÐISFJÖRÐUR

SEYÐISFJÖRÐUR

Seydisfjordur is considered one of Iceland’s most picturesque towns, because of its stunning natural scenery and its historic wooden buildings. Though there is also a vibrant art scene, with a festival held in mid-July and the Skaftafell’s Visual Art Centre hosting events on local and international levels. Despite being small, Seydisfjordur is known for its thriving art scene. There’s also the Technical Museum of East Iceland that hosts all kinds of technical innovations. The surroundings of Seydisfjordur also offer excellent hiking routes, a small ski area, golf, and a swimming pool. Norræna ferry runs between continental Europe and Iceland every week all year round.

NESKAUPSTAÐUR

NESKAUPSTAÐUR

Neskaupsstaður is known for the music scene where the blues, rock and jazz club Brján serves as a central hub and the town is home to Iceland’s only hard-rock and metal music festival, Eistnaflug - one of the most interesting tourist attractions in Iceland. Hiking trails around Neskaupsstaður are renowned for their natural beauty and diverse wildlife. Neskaupsstaður thrives as a fishing town but it also caters to tourists with good restaurants and bars, as well as excellent opportunities for outdoor adventures and tours such as horseback riding, kayaking and boat rides. You can also visit The Museum House, a renovated building situated by the sea and home to three collections: those of the Museum of Natural History, Tryggvi Ólafsson’s Art Collection and Jósafat Hinriksson’s Seafaring and Smithy Museum.

EGILSSTAÐIR

EGILSSTAÐIR

Egilsstaðir is on the Lagarfljót river and is the largest town in East Iceland. There is a wide range of cultural activities and festivals in music, art, and drama along with other clubs and organisations. Rare forests, waterfalls, lakes, and rivers make the area wonderful for outdoor activities. Visit the Egilsstaðir Swimming Pool for family fun, and the East Iceland Heritage Museum for a look into East Iceland history or the The Slaughterhouse Culture Centre for their newest exhibition or concert. Egilsstaðir is full of Iceland nature attractions - walking and hiking trails, bird-watching, fishing, and the unique chance to see wild Icelandic reindeer.

VOPNAFJÖRÐUR

VOPNAFJÖRÐUR

Vopnafjorður is known for Hofsá and Selá - two of the most exclusive salmon rivers in Iceland, and the landscape is diverse with snowy mountains, rolling heaths, highland lakes, beautiful waterfalls, rocky hills, coastal cliffs and black beaches. In town, stop by Kaupvangur, which houses an information centre, a cosy café, an exhibition on national treasure composer brothers Jonas and Jón Múli, and another exhibition on the East Iceland Emigration Centre, in remembrance of thousands of emigrants who moved to Canada and the US after the Askja volcano eruption in 1875. You can also visit the Burstafell Museum - a quaint, century’s old Icelandic family turf house. It is one of the best preserved and most beautiful turf houses in the country, and is one of the top attractions for anyone interested in Icelandic history.

BORGARFJÖRÐUR EYSTRI

BORGARFJÖRÐUR EYSTRI

The village of Bakkagerði is a picturesque seaside fishing village and is home to around 130 people and one of the fun things to do in Iceland! Next to the village, you can learn about the local folklore and the most populated elfin settlements in Iceland, including the rocky outcrop Álfaborgin, or the Elves’ Castle, where the queen of the elves lives. A panoramic viewing platform is at the peak to help hikers orientate themselves and identify the surrounding mountains. The small marina on Hafnarhólmi island was awarded the Blue On the island and there is a network of well-marked hiking routes throughout the region. Local authorities have developed a wide range of services including campsites, different types of accommodation, museums, guiding services, travel planning and transportation.